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Put Down That #1 Dad Mug! Here's A DIY Gift Any Dad Will Love - The Classy Housewife

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Home Home DIY Put Down That #1 Dad Mug! Here's A DIY Gift Any Dad...

Put Down That #1 Dad Mug! Here’s A DIY Gift Any Dad Will Love

Not Another Tie. Haven’t Dads Suffered Enough?

The Semi-Shameful History of Father’s Day (62 Years in the Making!)

Father’s Day first came about in 1910 as a complement to Mother’s Day (first celebrated in 1908) but was unable to keep its momentum, not making into the national consciousness until the 1930’s.  Sonora Smart Dodd, the woman credited with conceiving of and promoting it to national prominence, was raised by a single father of six children and argued that fathers deserved the same symbolic appreciation as mothers.

Because of promotional support from manufacturers of father-friendly gifts, Americans were skeptical of Father’s Day as an attempt to copy off the commercial success of Mother’s Day, and the holiday was met with resistance for decades. Several times over a period of decades Congress attempted and blocked making it official holiday. Finally Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first official proclamation in 1966 declaring the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day, and 1972 Richard Nixon officially signed it into law as a permanent national holiday.

Mother’s Versus Father’s Day  (Hint: Dad Loses)

A recent online survey conducted by RetailMeNot found that 86% of us buy gifts for Mother’s Day compared to 77% for Father’s Day. 20% of us admit to being more creative with gifts for our mothers compared to the thought we put into gifts for fathers.

The survey also found that 11% of us have forgotten to wish our father Happy Father’s Day in the past, and that 20% feel it’s acceptable to send dad a text or email to wish him a Happy Father’s Day. A higher percentage of respondents indicated that a gift isn’t necessary if we see our dad on Father’s Day when compared to the same question regarding our mothers. Additional responses from this and other surveys highlight how moms win out every year.

What Do Dads Want?

It boils down to this: According to a survey of fathers, dad enjoys quality time spent with the family on Father’s Day. His least favorite gifts according to the survey? Ties and “#1 Dad” swag. So if you can plan a cookout at home on Father’s Day and bring everyone together, chances are he’ll love it.

SHOW YOUR APPRECIATION: MAKE DAD A MESSAGE JAR

If dads are seeking quality time with the family, you can bet they want to be connected with their loved ones. The message jar is genuine, heartfelt, and worth cherishing. The Message Jar is a simple, elegant, but meaningful way to share often-unspoken thoughts with your father via small notes placed in a jar or box from which dad can select notes at a later time. It’s perfect for kids of all ages to create and present to dad, although very young children may need some assistance. This gift is sure to bring a smile to his face and warm his heart many times over. The basics:

1. Find or buy a lidded jar, canister, or box of some sort – something that provides easy access to the contents.  Sealed canisters that typically hold flour or dry goods come in many sizes, shapes, and designs and can be a beautiful keepsake that dad will be proud to display. If you want something a little extra special, select a decorated glass, ceramic, or pottery canister – even a piece from a line or set of tableware or china that you think your dad will like and that would look good in his office or on his dresser.

It can also be fun to take a plain jar or box and design it specifically for your father, perhaps even including a favorite photograph of you with your father from any period of your life.

2. Next, use small, blank, folded cards or even folded pieces of paper to write out positive, loving personal messages that you know dad will appreciate or that you haven’t shared with him before. (They don’t have to be long; even a single sentence can be heartwarming.) You can include a variety of notes, including a selection of messages that tell dad what you appreciate about him, some that focus on what you admire about him, fond or funny memories that have meaning to you, why you love dad,  what you’ve learned from him, etc.

3. You may prefer to choose a theme for your messages and write each note with that theme in mind. If you go with a theme, consider identifying the theme somewhere on the container. For example, “What My Dad Means/You Mean To Me.” Or “52 Things I Love About My Dad,” “I’m Happy You’re My Dad Because…,” “Favorite Memories With Dad,” etc.

4. Do you specifically intend for your dad to keep the jar or box in his office? Or do prefer the idea of him keeping it at home?  Do you want for him to read the notes at certain intervals, such as a “one a day” note for 30 days plan, a “weekly” note for the entire year, or do you want for him to have the freedom to read a message whenever he chooses? Whatever your intent, if you have one, let dad know.

Message Jar Tips and Ideas:

  • Handwritten notes feel more personal than typed messages, unless your handwriting requires the FBI or a code breaker.
  • If you’re able, use small note cards that include envelopes. Business card-sized note stationery (or smaller if you can find them) stuffed into fitted envelopes have greater aesthetic appeal and feel extra special.
  • Use ink, never pencil, especially if using stationery paper instead of note cards. Dad will likely keep these notes for many years, and it would be sort of sad if the notes faded.
  • Because dad will likely keep these cards, carefully consider that what you write will be read again, and again, probably many times over the years. Don’t hold back. Say what you’ll someday wish you’d written on these notes. Put your heart into it and, even if you used a “mixed-bag” theme of notes, make sure that the majority are the sincere thoughts that let your father know why he’s worth celebrating, why he’s special to you, and why you love him.
  • Why not throw in some surprise “coupon” vouchers for dad? Depending on the giver’s age, examples of coupons might be a breakfast in bed, wash dad’s car, take dad to lunch – you’ll have an idea of what your dad will appreciate.
  • This doesn’t have to be for dads alone. If you’ve lost your father, or if your father isn’t in your life for whatever reason, you can create this same type of gift for anyone who’s been influential in your life.
  • This is also perfect for friends, colleagues, children, teachers, etc. and, depending on the receiver, you may choose to include a collection of inspirational quotes, motivational messages, poetry, or humorous vignettes rather than personal notes.
  • Although Mother’s Day has come and gone this year, this makes a wonderful gift for your mom as well. Whether for next Mother’s Day, her birthday, Christmas, or for no reason at all, mom will love having her own set of personalized messages.
  • If you do plan to one day give a message jar to mom, avoid hurt feelings by using relatively similar level of personal messages or memories for both parents. (Or more than one child if you’re a parent who wants to share a jar with your kids.) For example, even though it’s not a contest, one parent might be a little bummed at receiving motivational quotes if you wrote beautiful personal notes for the other.
  • Regardless of the recipient, this doesn’t have to be a one-time gift. You may choose to do a different theme every year or to simply write from your heart again. For smaller children creating a message jar (even if mom has to write out the message), dad will get a kick out of seeing how the notes change as a child grows up.

Most importantly, be creative and have fun with it. While dads may at times feel quietly unappreciated considering the attention we focus on Mother’s Day compared to Father’s Day (history combined with current data speaks for itself!), a personalized container full of heartfelt notes is a touching way to let dad know that you love and appreciate him. He will certainly return to that jar far more often than he would have worn that tie or used that #1 Dad mug.

And whatever you do, wish your dad Happy Father’s Day in person or with a phone call.  Save the text or email to wish him a happy Cow Appreciation Day or Teddy Bear Picnic day next month. Yes, those are real, and we likely didn’t wait 62 years for them.

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